Children Eating 12 Or More Hotdogs

Children Eating 12 Or More Hotdogs
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According to figures from the National Cancer Institute, cancer is among the leading cause of death among children younger than 14 years. [1] It’s estimated that over 11,000 new cases were diagnosed in 2019, with leukemia, lymphomas, and brain cancers being the most common.

With such worrying statistics, findings associating hotdogs with an increased risk of developing leukemia in children are a merited source of concern. In particular, research conducted by a team of scientists from the University of Southern California School of Medicine in Los Angeles claimed that children who ate more than a dozen hotdogs every month were 9 times more likely to develop leukemia. [2]

The findings, which were published in the Journal of Cancer Causes and Control, shed light on the relation between “food items thought to be precursors or inhibitors of N-nitroso compounds (NOC) and risk of leukemia.” This might help explain the high incidence of childhood brain tumors and leukemia over the last few decades.

The researchers suggest that nitrites used to preserve processed meats (such as those used in hotdogs). When consumed, nitrites are converted into nitrosamines – which are highly carcinogenic. Similarly, the American Cancer Society has long warned against the regular consumption of processed meat and red meat due to their documented carcinogenic properties. [3]

Takeaway
While the study is neither conclusive nor meant to make hotdogs the villain, it’s worth considering the risk of leukemia – especially with the increased number of incidences. Rather than consume processed meats, we should opt for healthier alternatives such as beans, poultry, fish, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

Please note that this content should never be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinicians.

References:

[1] Childhood Cancers https://www.cancer.gov/types/childhood-cancers.

[2] Peters, J. M. 1994. Processed meats and risk of childhood leukemia (California, USA). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8167267.

[3] What’s Wrong with Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, and Bacon? https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/hot-dogs-hamburgers-bacon.html.

Depression, Anxiety and Panic Attacks

Depression, Anxiety and Panic Attacks
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Struggling with depression, anxiety, or panic attacks? Always keep in mind that you’re not alone – there are millions of people affected by these mental health illnesses. In fact, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) claims that 40 million American adults are affected by anxiety disorders, another 17.3 million have a depressive disorder, and 6 million are affected by a panic disorder.

Although there are several effective treatments to manage these conditions – including psychotherapy and behavioral therapy – most cases remain untreated. The World Health Organization notes that up to 85% of victims in middle- and low-income countries do not receive treatment.

Most health care providers identify social stigma and misdiagnosis as one of the main barriers to effective mental health care – and it’s easy to see why. Some people are afraid of speaking out due to statements such as “pull yourself together” or “everyone gets anxious and depressed, just snap out of it.” This is often fueled by the assumption that admitting you’re going through depression or anxiety is a sign of weakness – but it couldn’t be further from the truth.

Sure, most of us feel anxious, depressed, or experience a panic attack from time to time. But in the case of clinical or diagnosable mental health issues, there’s more to it than ‘shaking it off’ – professional medical care and social support are necessary to avoid adverse mental and physical effects. Remember, sharing your experiences and offering support is a sign of strength!

Please note that this content should never be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinicians.

References:

[1] Anxiety And Depression Association of America Facts & Statistics https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics.

[2] Depression https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/depression.

Deep Breathing Is One Of The Body’s Strongest Self-Healing Mechanisms

Deep Breathing Is One Of The Body's Strongest Self-Healing Mechanisms
Graphic: © herbs-info.com. Images © kwikit – fotolia.com (under license)

Breathing sustains life! We take in oxygen, invigorate our red blood cells, expel toxins such as carbon dioxide, and provide our bodies with life-sustaining energy. And according to several scientific sources, deep breathing could offer more short-term and long-term health benefits.

Ever wondered why you’re advised to take deep breathes when you’re stressed or trying to focus? Or why is deep breathing a core part of all meditation techniques? The answers to the healing powers of deep breathing lie in the physiological changes that take place in our bodies. Allowing the rib cage to expand and the diaphragm to drop creates more space for oxygen to flood your body, leading to the following health benefits:

⦁ Lowered heart rate: According to a study in the Journal of Frontiers in Public Health, deep breathing (6 breathes per minute) significantly improved heart rate variability. [1]

⦁ Lowered blood pressure: Meditation techniques, which included deep breathing, “decreased blood pressure in association with decreased psychological distress, and increased coping in young adults at risk for hypertension.” This was the conclusion of a study published in the American Journal of Hypertension. [2]

⦁ Helping with sleeplessness: Some studies suggest that deep breathing and mindful meditation could be an effective alternative to traditional treatments for chronic insomnia. [3]

⦁ Relieving anxiety and depression: Providing our brains with a great deal of oxygen enhances our ability to memorize, concentrate, focus, and even relieve depression, anxiety, and stress. [4]

⦁ Improved immunity: The stress response is known to suppress our immune, and increase the susceptibility to illnesses. By enhancing our mental and physical energy through deep breathing, we can promote better immunity.

Please note that this content should never be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinicians.

References:

[1] Steffen, P. R. et al. 2017. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575449/.

[2] Nidich, S. I. et al. 2009. A randomized controlled trial on effects of the Transcendental Meditation program on blood pressure, psychological distress, and coping in young adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798037.

[3] Ong, J. C. et al. 2014. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for chronic insomnia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25142566.

[4] Lakhan, S. E. et al. 2013. Mindfulness-Based Therapies in the Treatment of Somatization Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071834.