16 Veggies You Can Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps

Please Share This Page:

If you are a first-time visitor, please be sure to like us on Facebook and receive our exciting and innovative tutorials on herbs and natural health topics!

16 Veggies That You Can Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps



Photo – © mbongo – Fotolia.com

Here’s an old idea that seems to have been completely forgotten about until recently: There are several foods which you can re-grow from saved pieces and will create a whole new plant! Isn’t nature amazing?

This idea seems to be undergoing an “internet renaissance” with the resurgence of interest in homesteading, survival skills and similar pursuits. Together with seed saving techniques, you can save a lot of money on groceries this way.



Because this method is in effect a simple type of cloning, the plants you get will very very similar to the ones you grew them from. So be sure to pick the tastiest, best varieties to regrow! Purchase veggies of a super-high quality once, and continue to harvest time and time again.

Another thing to consider is that (for example) a whole garlic bulb can be re-grown from a single clove. So there is the potential for creating a whole garden from a few pieces and multiplying your yield.

We discovered a great list of 16 plants that can be re-grown. Note that each of these veggies has a specific technique that goes with re-planting it – so you will need not just the list but to read the instructions – which are provided.

Ok, here is the link (archive version) for the full list and tutorials on how to grow the veggies: http://wakeup-world.com/2012/10/15/16-foods-thatll-re-grow-from-kitchen-scraps/

Please Share This Page:

18 Comments

  • By april, June 3, 2013 @ 3:25 pm

    Looking for info on sprouting an avocado pit. Thanks for the post. I’ve used sprouting onions to grow green tops to use in cooking. Will have to try celery and bok choy.

  • By admin, June 6, 2013 @ 1:05 am

    Link to the original source with all the info is at the foot of my article. As always.

  • By Sandra Hozey, July 6, 2013 @ 3:43 pm

    How wonderful of you to share this information
    with us.Where would we be if we didn’t have people
    Like you who care about people like us?I know I
    Would left in the dark and broke.Than you for
    Sharing and caring look forward to hear from you again.
    This is my first time reading your posts.

  • By monica smith, July 20, 2013 @ 1:20 pm

    Has anyone tried basil cot a piece of cut of the top leaves,nip of leaves at bottom,just leaving leaves in middle, root in water then plant,really easy

  • By Carole Douglas, July 20, 2013 @ 2:41 pm

    We have a 4 yr. old avocado tree we started in potting soil. Feed citrus/avocado food. Hoping for fruit in the next yr. :) God bless you.

  • By AGST, July 20, 2013 @ 4:05 pm

    April, I just placed the avocado pit in a pot with regular potting soil & watered regularly. It sprouted in a couple weeks, and in no time I have a 2 foot tall plant with shiny leaves. I really wasn’t expecting it to grow, so it is in too small of a pot. I will have to transplant it soon.

  • By Veronique, August 14, 2013 @ 2:47 am

    Hate to burst anyone’s bubble, but avocado trees grown from seeds take anywhere from 7-15 years–usually closer to 10, to bare fruit. The fruit is somewhat different from the parent as you’re now a generation down. Avocado plants you buy at nurseries that do bare fruit are taken from cuttings from mataure avocado trees. I’ve got a “tree” that is about 5 months old. I often wonder where the heck I’ll be when that finally starts producing. http://www.californiaavocado.com/grow-your-own-tree/

  • By admin, August 14, 2013 @ 4:27 am

    Thanks for your comment Veronique! It sounds like you know what you are about, and that’s the kind of comment we like around here even though it might be contrary to the OP. Ok, so looks like we’re down to “15 veggies you can regrow, plus one that takes a long-ass time”… ;)

  • By Jacky, October 8, 2013 @ 8:41 pm

    Love ur posts

  • By Nynature, October 8, 2013 @ 11:44 pm

    Mushrooms are not a vegetable. They are a fungai. Not only that, each mushroom variety has its own growing conditions. Shitake grow in either sawdust mixture or via plugs in hard wood logs. I’d say the easiest ones to grow in soil would be the white button mushrooms. But just plunking any mushroom into soil and hoping it will regrow is wishful thinking.

  • By Lori, October 13, 2013 @ 12:11 pm

    I would suggest using organic veg. Many conventional veg such as potatoes are treated with an anti growth agent to prevent early sprouting.

  • By paul, October 29, 2013 @ 6:30 pm

    Now that I’ve seen it works I’m always putting seeds from my fruits and veggies in the soil just to see the results

  • By Miro, December 11, 2013 @ 11:30 pm

    Also tomatoes, chillies and capsicums are too easy. When making salads or sandwiches a few seeds always escape so when cleaning the chopping board I just wipe all into my vegetable garden and every year I get chillies and tomatoes. I haven’t been lucky enough with capsicums so not sure if the seeds are infertile or the local birds find then extra tasty.

    Avocado was too easy – I have sprouted 3 so far by finding them sprouting in my worm farm and the planting them. 6 years on they are 5 foot tall but no sign of fruit. In Melbourne I may not get any but it is fun watching them grow.

  • By Miro, December 11, 2013 @ 11:33 pm

    I haven’t had much luck with apricots and other stone fruit tho. I save the seed and either burry it in seedling tray and potting mix right away or after they dry. Nothing sprouts. Actually now thinking about it is it the whole pip that should be buried or should the pip be split and only the inner seed can sprout?

  • By Sandra, December 27, 2013 @ 4:41 am

    I have grown celery, potatoes, onions, garlic from roots. Tomatoes, squash, okra, cucumbers, peppers. pumpkins, watermelon and other veggies from seed.

  • By Om Livin, December 28, 2013 @ 12:43 am

    Does anyone know if after a few times of regrowing these plants, if they lose nutrients?

  • By Sharon, February 18, 2014 @ 3:11 pm

    I have one question if someone could answer it would make me happy, Can I store seeds , roots over the winter months seeing I can’t plant till the ground thaws? Thank you !!

  • By Samuel, February 25, 2014 @ 1:09 am

    @Sharon you can keep seeds for a long while. Lay them out on a paper towel and let them dry out really well then just as long as you keep the seeds in a dry dark spot in your house it should be fine. Not too sure about roots though, I’ve never had experience with roots

Other Links to this Post

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

WordPress Themes